Bill Clinton planned to appoint senator named in Epstein documents to Supreme Court in 1994

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Just a day prior to the reported jail cell suicide of previously convicted pedophile Jeffrey Epstein, court documents from a lawsuit filed by one of Epstein’s underage accusers were unsealed, revealing the names of several prominent figures, including well-known politicians.

It has long been established that there was a friendship between Epstein and former President Bill Clinton, but the name of another individual revealed to have possibly been involved in Epstein’s alleged crimes is that of a well-respected former senator who Clinton hoped would accept his nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court back in 1994.

Senator denies involvement

The Daily Caller reported that former Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell, a long-serving Democrat senator from Maine, was named in Virginia Guiffre’s lawsuit as one of the many high-profile people with whom she was allegedly forced to have sex while she was under Epstein’s control.

Unsurprisingly, Mitchell denied any sort of wrongdoing with regard to Guiffre or Epstein in a statement provided to a local media outlet after the court documents were unsealed.

“I have never met, spoken with or had any contact with Ms. Giuffre,” Mitchell told the Portland Press Herald. “In my contacts with Mr. Epstein I never observed or suspected any inappropriate conduct with underage girls. I only learned of his actions when they were reported in the media related to his prosecution in Florida. We have had no further contact.”

Clinton SCOTUS pick

The Daily Caller noted that Mitchell was President Clinton’s first choice to replace the retiring Supreme Court Justice Harry Blackmun in 1994, a seat on the bench that was ultimately filled by Justice Stephen Breyer.

Mitchell had more than sufficient legal experience prior to becoming a senator in 1980 to justify Clinton’s choice, as he previously served as an antitrust lawyer in the Department of Justice, as U.S. attorney for Maine, and as a federal judge in Bangor.

However, Mitchell reportedly declined the nomination to the high court because he wanted to focus all of his attention and energy as a lawmaker on supporting and assisting in the passage of Clinton’s ill-fated health care reform plan.

Clinton nevertheless appreciated and respected Mitchell’s decision, and stated publicly in 1994 that he had thanked Mitchell “for his willingness to forgo a great personal opportunity, in anticipation of an enormous struggle with an uncertain result, for a result that is worth the careers of many of us.”

Seeking justice

To be sure, while there is some evidence linking Clinton and Epstein during the former president’s tenure in the White House, there is little to suggest that any of the alleged sex crimes with underage girls were occurring at that time. Guiffre’s lawsuit alleges the crimes took place in the early- to mid-2000s, so it is impossible to say with any certainty whether the alleged proclivities were a factor in the relationship between Clinton and Mitchell.

That said, there is plenty of evidence connecting Clinton — and many others — with Epstein during the time period in question and, hopefully, the ongoing investigation into Epstein’s alleged misdeeds will expose any and all co-conspirators and complicit witnesses to the ghastly crimes against young girls of which Epstein was accused.

Suicide or not, there is a reckoning that is desperately needed by the numerous alleged victims — if not the country as a whole — and all who were involved need to be held fully responsible for their actions.

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